Five Things to Take Away from 2017-2018 Euroleague Regular Season

I’ve been away from the Euroleague scene for the most part of the 2017-2018 season. Job and personal commitments can do that, especially when you run any web site as a labor of love, not for profit. However, as I do every year, I get sucked back into the Euroleague at some point in the season, and luckily for me, I have gotten back in, right come playoff time.

So, being the opinionated person that I am, here are five things to take away from this year’s Euroleague Regular Season. This isn’t really a post for detailed analysis. I would suggest Euroleague Adventures, Eurohoops, Courtside Diaries, or various other European basketball sources to get something really detailed. However, for a light look, this may be worth a gander.

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Maccabi Tel Aviv not back…but they’re not a mess

I will tip my hat to Neven Spahija, who got Maccabi Tel Aviv back to respectability this year after the club went through two miserable seasons prior. Though their 13-17 record doesn’t look good on paper, they were 12-10 at the 22-round mark, and were a few points away from being a .500 or better team during their 1-7 stretch. Yes, it was baby steps in Spahija’s first season, but that is what this franchise needed, especially after their four-head coach debacle in 2016-2017 where they went 10-20 and finished 14th in the Euroleague standings.

As always, American import talent was the key to success this year, as guards Pierre Jackson and Norris Cole came from the G-League and NBA, respectively to lead Maccabi Tel Aviv on the offensive end. DeShaun Thomas and Alex Tyus (making his triumphant return to Israel) also added some versatility in the post, as Thomas became an inside-out threat, while Tyus finished well in the pick and roll and provided much needed shot blocking in the post, something they missed dearly a season ago. Lastly, Artisom Parkhouski offered some nice skill and touch in the paint after coming over from UNICS Kazan a year ago.

At the same time though, this roster probably is still in some need of change. This team didn’t score much from beyond the arc, as they only scored 24.6 percent of their total points from beyond the arc, the worst mark in the Euroleague, according to overbasket.com. While it’s important for a team to have an identity (Zalgiris was second-last in this mark and made the playoffs), the Maccabi offense seemed to lack variety, and they struggled to find scoring when they couldn’t get their main horses going. It will be interesting to see how Spahija maneuvers lineups down the stretch in the Winner League season, as how the team (as well as certain players) finish in domestic play could make a difference in terms of who stays and who doesn’t for the 2018-2019 season.

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Sarunas Jasikevicius is building something special in Kaunas

Saras continues to improve as a coach at the professional level. When he took over Zalgiris during the 2015-2016 season, it seemed like he was in a bit over his head, unable to connect with the roster, demanding the same kind of perfection as a coach that he demanded from himself as a player. This led to a disastrous last-place finish in Top 16 play. In year 2, thanks to a full off-season, and getting more players to fit his style, Zalgiris stayed in the playoff hunt for almost all of the season, finishing 14-16, good for 10th overall in the Euroleague standings. Saras’ reputation blew through the roof, as he was linked to many coaching vacancies in the summer as a result.

This year, Saras may be on the cusp of building something really special in his home country of Lithuania. Zalgiris swept traditional Euroleague powers Olympiacos, Barcelona, and Olimpia Milano and finished 18-12, 6th overall in the standings, and qualified for the playoffs (where they will face Olympiacos, a possible upset in the making). And Saras accomplished all this with the same, mostly Lithuanian, roster from the past couple of seasons. Yes, Aaron White proved to be a great wing acquisition from Zenit. And yes, point guard Kevin Pangos has seemed to thrive under the tutelage of Saras in two seasons. But make no mistake: the heart and soul of this team comes from local Lithuanian talent, not imports (which is the inverse of what most Euroleague clubs do, with the exception of Crvena Zvezda).

Saras will once again be courted hard by Euroleague powers or big-money clubs (Russian ones come to mind). However, what Saras is doing in Zalgiris is unique, and I think he will continue to build Zalgiris into a Euroleague power for at least the next few years.

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Give Baskonia’s Pedro Martinez his due

When Pedro Martinez took over Baskonia, the club was 0-4 and just had first-time head coach Pablo Prigioni abruptly resign. Baskonia was hoping to find the same kind of magic with Prigioni that Zalgiris found with Saras and instead, it backfired tremendously. As for Martinez, despite leading Valencia to an ACB title, a Euroleague berth, and a Eurocup runners-up finish in 2016-2017, he was sent packing from Valencia, and was jobless going into the 2017-2018.

It’s amazing how things work out sometimes.

Since Martinez took over, Baskonia has gone 16-10 and qualified for the playoffs, something that seemed unthinkable after Round 4. And they have done this despite losing Euroleague defensive player of the year, Adam Hanga, who left for Barcelona in the off-season. Martinez has really utilized the strengths of this roster, leaning on Toko Shengalia, who may be a dark horse Euroleague MVP candidate, while getting the most out of young talent like Luca Vildoza, Janis Timma, and Vincent Poirier.

It won’t be an easy matchup for Baskonia in the playoffs, as they will take on the defending champs, Fenerbahce, in the first round. However, the Martinez hire has gone from a temporary stopgap solution to perhaps one they can build upon in the near future.

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Things not much better with Barcelona and Olimpia Milano…

Both Barcelona and Olimpia Milano made big-time coaching hires to get their clubs going back in the right direction after sub-par 2016-2017 campaigns. However, both squads struggled to get anything going, and once again finished near the bottom of the regular season standings in the Euroleague.

Barcelona showed a lot of promise this off-season by not only hiring Sito Alonso from Baskonia, but also acquiring top talent in the backcourt in Thomas Huertel (from Efes), Phil Pressey (from the G-League), Edwin Jackson, and Euroleague defensive player of the year Adam Hanga. And yet, that top talent and coaching change wasn’t enough, as the Barcelona club went 7-14 before firing Alonso and replacing him with Svetislav Pesic for the remainder of the year. The Catalan club showed some improvement by finishing 4-4 in his 8-game tenure, but the lackluster 11-19 overall record and sparse crowds at Palau Blaugrana hasn’t given the franchise much to be hopeful about this season.

As for Milano, the big-name hire of Simone Pianigiani was a controversial one, as he was known as a foil to the Milano franchise during his tenure with Montespachi Siena. Unfortunately, things proved to be more of the same for the Milano club, the lone Italian representative in the Euroleague for the second-straight season. They went 10-20 during the regular season, and once again weren’t able to get much out of high-profile signings such as Andrew Goudelock, Jordan Theodore, Curtis Jerrells (who came with him from Hapoel Jerusalem) or Mindaugas Kuzmiskas (who came over after being waived by the New York Knicks). MIlano still holds the top spot in the Italian League standings and looks like a strong candidate to rebound with a domestic league title, which evaded them a year ago, so maybe year two in the Euroleague will be kinder for Simone (if he makes it that long of course).

So why is this a big deal? Well, both are A-License clubs, meaning that they are entrenched in the Euroleague for 10-year periods of time, regardless of finish in the Euroleague or their domestic league. That isn’t the case for most other clubs, who have to earn their right to stay in the Euroleague on an annual basis (by winning their domestic league competition or qualifying as an at-large). And thus, with sparse crowds and lackluster play, these two clubs are definitely making the argument that the Euroleague has to seriously re-visit their policy with handing out A-Licenses. This may not be something that will happen in the near future, but another season or two of mediocre play from these two clubs may (or should) start the discussion sooner rather than later.

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It’s a pretty wide open Euroleague playoff race

There’s no real dominant Euroleague squad this year. CSKA holds the top spot, but they’re not the same without Milos Teodosic, and they have had their share of injury issues, much like other top clubs such as Fenerbahce and Real Madrid. Fenerbahce doesn’t have the dominant feel of last year’s squad (not to mention game changers like Ekpe Udoh or Bogdan Bogdanovic). Real Madrid’s success corresponds with Luka Doncic, which is a lot of pressure for a teenager. Panathinaikos looks like a top end club at times, and certainly has the depth to win a Euroleague title, but on some occasions they looked like a middle-of-the-road team. And Olympiacos? “Kill Bill” Vassilis Spanoulis is starting to show his age, and the depth on this Piraeus squad just isn’t what it once was.

The bottom line? Expect something surprising this postseason. The last few Euroleague postseasons have been pretty chalk, but every club in the playoffs this season has some serious flaws. Yes, that makes it tough for betting, but for those who like excitement and shockers, this Euroleague postseason may have a lot to offer.

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Retro Reblog: Grading the International Talent in the NBA Draft Over the Past 15 Years

In honor of NBA draft week, thought I would bring this post up from last year and add on to it.

2016 NBA Draft International talent: Bender, Papagiannis, J. Hernangomez, Yabusele, Zizic, Luwawu, Korkmaz, Zubac, Zagorac, Michineau, Qi, Cordinier, Zipser, Zhelin.

Sabonis (Gonzaga), Poeltl (Utah), Bolomboy (Ukraine) were European players who played in college. Pretty stacked international class. Probably a B as of now, with potential to be an A class in a couple of seasons. Much better than the international talent in this upcoming draft, which was hurt by a lot of players dropping out at the last minutes.

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How will Dragan Bender and the rest of his international 2016 NBA Draft classmates fare in the NBA? Let’s take a look at previous ones to get some perspective.

With the 2016 NBA Draft coming up tomorrow, there has already been a lot of discussion about some of the European and International talent that can be taken in the draft. With Kristaps Porzingis having a sterling year with the New York Knicks last season, and the precedent set by European-born NBA superstars such as Dirk Nowitzki of the Dallas Mavericks, Tony Parker and Manu Ginobili of the San Antonio Spurs, and Pau Gasol of the Chicago Bulls, demand for foreign basketball talent is higher than ever. And for good reason, as basketball development in Europe has garnered high praises for focusing on “developing” skills in their youth academies rather than trying to win games (as is the issue with the…

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Five coaches who will be talked about in Euroleague circles this summer

With the Turkish Basketball Super League (BSL),  Liga Endesa ACB (Spain), Lega Basket Serie A (Italy) and LNB (France) nearing it’s conclusion in the next week or so, the European domestic basketball season is practically finished. While for some, this means a break from basketball. For others, (such as myself), it means scouring the European basketball hot stove and rumors over Twitter.

Unlike the NBA, the player hot stove Europe stretches from now-to-August. At the conclusion of the NBA Summer League, it becomes clear who is going to be playing on a NBA team in October, and who most likely is bound back to Europe or the D-League (Well, G-League I guess now). However, in June, the biggest news centers on coaches, especially when it comes to Euroleague jobs. Which coou coaches are in? Which coaches are out? Which rumors are true? Which ones are unfounded?

Of course, you could argue a lot of names will be discussed as possible hires (or fires). However, I have focused on five names European basketball fans should pay attention to this summer who will have an impact on a Euroleague club or two this summer. First though, let’s take a look at some coaches who barely missed the cut.

  • Ufuk Sarica, Besiktas: An underrated coach who took Besiktas to the BSL Finals, and has showed some fight against heavily favored Fenerbahce (though they are down 3-0, and with the promise of an empty arena for Game 4 due to fan sanctions, they most likely will be swept). He won the BSL with Pinar Karsiyaka in 2014, which got them their first Euroleague berth in club history. He’s an excellent X’s and O’s guy, and he gets the most out of his talent. He also will be the head coach for the Turkish National Team this summer as well. However, I don’t know if he has the kind of reputation yet for a job outside of Turkey.
  • Andrea Trinchieri, Brose Bamberg: Another season; another BBL title for Bamberg and Trinchieri. The Italian-Croatian head coach is one of the most brilliant offensive minds in Europe, and he is bound for a Euroleague A license job after succeeding with smaller clubs such as Bamberg and previously Cantu in Italy. However, he has apparently agreed to an extension with the German club, and Olimpia Milano, a rumored destination for Trinchieri, decided to go with former Hapoel Jerusalem and Siena coach Simone Pianigiani. Therefore, he’ll most likely wait at least one more year with Bamberg before making that jump to a bigger European club.
  • Ioannis Sfairopoulos, Olympiacos: So far, nothing has been mentioned yet, and his job seems safe, as the concern now is building the roster. However, the epic collapse to rival Panathinaikos in the Greek Basket League championship (they were up 2-1 and had Game 5 in Piraeus), as well as the lack of a Euroleague championship hasn’t exactly made his status sturdy by any measure. He’ll probably be the coach in October, but if he gets off to a slow start, don’t be surprised to see him as the first coach gone in the Euroleague.
  • Dimitris Itoudis, CSKA: Rumors began to spread after the Final Four that a collapse in the VTB finals would send Itoudis packing, especially with David Blatt formerly on the open market (more on that in a bit). However, Itoudis dispatched Khimki in convincing fashion, and he once again claimed the throne as one of the top coaches in Europe.

All right. Here are five coaches you will be hearing about this summer who will be having an impact on the Euroleague this summer.

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Sito Alonso (formerly of Baskonia)

The Spanish Alonso was let go by Baskonia this week, as the club decided it needed to go in a different direction. Coaches don’t last long in the Basque country, as Alonso was the club’s sixth coach since 2012. That being said, Alonso didn’t have a poor season by any means. The club finished second in the ACB with a record of 23-9 in the regular season, and seventh in the Euroleague with a record of 17-13, qualifying for the playoffs. However, the Vitoria-based club was swept by CSKA in the Euroleague, and was upset by third-seeded Valencia in the semifinals (including a loss at home in game 1). Despite the solid paper numbers, it wasn’t enough for Alonso to get another year as Baskonia’s head coach.

However, I do not imagine Alonso will unemployed for a long period of time. Alonso has a sterling reputation as a developer of youth talent, as he coached the Spanish U-20 team in 2013. One job he has been tied to is the vacant Barcelona job, where he was a candidate last season before it ultimately went to Georgios Bartzokas. Barcelona is going through a rebuilding process, as it is trying to restock its developmental teams, and try to build (relatively) within rather than hang their hat on veteran free agent talent (which has burned them the past couple of seasons). Alonso, with his youthful energy and Spanish coaching experience, could be the guy to fit that description perfectly.

(Update: Just after I posted this, Barcelona announces that they have hired Alonso. Hat tip to the comments below)

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Georgios Bartzokas (formerly of Barcelona)

Since we’re speaking of Barcelona, the next coach that will be discussed is former Barcelona coach Bartzokas, who was let go after a disappointing season where his club finished sixth in the ACB (22-10, behind Unicaja and Tenerife, clubs they usually are head and shoulders above budget-wise) and 12-18 in the Euroleague (11th overall). Bartzokas struggled to implement his style with an aging club, and multitudes of injuries didn’t help him either in his first and only season in Catalan country.

That being said, there are mixed opinions out there regarding Bartzokas’ ouster. Some felt it needed to happen, as he was just an emergency choice last year after Zalgiris head coach Sarunas Jasikevicius didn’t work out (and seems to be the case again this year, as Saras is re-signing with his home country club). Some though felt he was slighted, as he didn’t have the right mix of talent to really make his system work. An up-tempo, defensive-oriented coach, Bartzokas could be a good fit at clubs such as Baskonia (though it appears that they are going to go with former player Pablo Prigioni) or Maccabi Tel Aviv, who both play a fast-pace, but could use improvement in terms of keeping opponents from scoring the ball.

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Dusko Ivanovic (currently of Khimki)

Ivanovic is a Euroleague coaching veteran, as he has coached Baskonia, Barcelona and Panathinaikos to varying levels of success. He came on last year with the Moscow-based club, and this season, he got Khimki to finish second in the VTB, which qualified them for the Euroleague. Dusko is an animated coach, who gives a lot of freedom to his star players, and that helped Russian star wing Alexey Shved, who earned VTB MVP honors this year during the regular season.

Unfortunately, Ivanovic didn’t end the postseason in the most inspiring way. Khimki was absolutely throttled by Moscow rival CSKA in the Finals, as they were swept easily 3-0, and really were never close in any of the three games. If that wasn’t enough, guard Jacob Pullen put the Montenegrin coach on blast, saying this about the Khimki head man according to Sportando.

Without an A license, and only 1 wild card spot available in the Euroleague under the new format, Khimki can’t afford to go through any growing pains in their return to Europe’s top competition. Yes, Dusko got them back to the Euroleague, and he should be appreciated for that. But considering how this season finished, it’s entirely possible that Khimki may be looking for a replacement in the next week or so.

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Pablo Laso, (currently of Real Madrid)

A month ago, Laso was on the top of Europe when it came to coaches. His Real Madrid club finished with the best record in both the ACB and Euroleague, his best player (Sergio Llull) won the Euroleague MVP award, and they had made the Final Four, looking for their second Euroleague title in three years. However, since the Final Four in Istanbul, the wheels have just came off for the Spanish juggernaut. The club finished an uninspiring fourth, getting absolutely blasted in the third place game by CSKA. They have looked uninspired in the playoffs, as they went three games with 8th seeded Andorra in the first round, picked up the slack against Unicaja (won 3-0), but now are on the verge of one of the biggest upsets in ACB history, as they are down 2-1 to Valencia with Game 4 on Friday at Fuente de San Luis.

It sounds crazy to see a coach go from the title of “best in Europe” to “possibly jobless” in less than a month, but this is Real Madrid, and the standard is incredibly high in the Spanish capital. The roster is one of the best-paid in Europe, and is chock full of former NBA stars (Ayon, Randolph, Fernandez, Nocioni for example). A domestic title should be the minimum expectation, and it’s entirely possible that Laso might not even accomplish that. Laso is a solid tactician, but he has come under fire for his stubbornness with rotations, and his inability to connect with the non-Spanish players on this roster. It’s possible that if they fall victim to Valencia, Los Blancos could upgrade this summer with a coach who is not only more adventurous rotation-wise, but also stronger in terms of relating better to the diverse roster. Maybe a return for Ettore Messina (who hasn’t found a NBA job despite being an assistant for a good while) or a Spanish welcome for…David Blatt?

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David Blatt (currently of Darussafaka)

Blatt apparently turned down a 3-year offer from Maccabi Tel Aviv, a club he won a Euroleague title with in 2014. For now, he says he is staying in Istanbul with Dacka, even though they will be regulated to the Eurocup next year after primary sponsor Dogus Group jumped ship to Fenerbahce. The reasoning behind Blatt’s decision to reject Maccabi’s lucrative offer? Blatt wants to return to the NBA after next year, and he only has 1 year left on his contract with Dacka. After next season, he will be free to negotiate with NBA teams without worry of a buyout. That wouldn’t be the case if he returned to Tel Aviv (where there would be some buyout agreement, due to it being a three-year deal; I can’t imagine MTA would give him an out where he could leave scott-free after all the turmoil they’ve experienced since he left).

But, as with all things in the European basketball scene, what is true today doesn’t necessarily mean it’ll be true tomorrow. Blatt, despite his pledge of commitment to Dacka, could change if the right offer comes up. What if Madrid offers him the head job with a low buyout after 1 season? What if Khimki lets go of Dusko and offers Blatt a 1-year deal, since they are only guaranteed to be in the Euroleague for that timespan? (Blatt coached the Russian National team and was rumored for the CSKA job if they parted ways with Itoudis.) I know Blatt says he’s going to be with Dacka in 2017-2018, but I can’t imagine Blatt is done listening to any possible offers that might come up this summer.

CSKA and de Colo remind VTB (and doubters) that they’re arguably Europe’s best

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It was easy to forget about how dominant CSKA Moscow was this season, especially leading into the VTB Finals against Moscow rival Khimki.

After all, considering their 2015-2016 campaign included a Euroleague and VTB title, this season could be considered a disappointment. They finished second in the regular season, looked shaky against Baskonia in the playoffs (though they did sweep), and they finished 3rd in the Euroleague Final Four, losing to underdog Olympiacos in the semifinals. For a powerhouse like CSKA, those results just aren’t enough.

And then there were all the other stories. The Milos Teodosic leaving to the NBA rumors. The whether “Dimitris Itoudis will be back as head coach” rumors. The rumors of David Blatt coming to replace him. Khimki’s epic comeback against Zenit St. Petersburg in the semifinals. Khimki’s Alexey Shved winning the VTB Regular Season MVP award.

There seemed to be all kinds of indicators that this would be series, that maybe CSKA would run out of gas, and Khimki, qualifying for the Euroleague with their semifinal win, would build on the momentum they achieved from their victory over Zenit. Milos would be distracted. Nando wouldn’t be able to handle the load himself. Itoudis would fold under the pressure of being on the “hot seat”. These were all stories that I thought would make this CSKA-Khimki finals a close and competitive series. Even the promos got me pumped that Khimki had a puncher’s chance of pulling the upset.

(Yes, I have no idea what the words say; I am not literate in Russian unfortunately.)

And yet, CSKA just slapped me and other doubters back into reality three games later.


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This was not a series by any stretch of the imagination. This was complete and utter domination from start to finish. CSKA completed their 9-0 undefeated run through the VTB playoffs (they also swept Astana in the first round and then Lokomotiv Kuban Krasnodar in the semifinals) by beating Khimki by an average of 16.3 ppg. The combination of Aaron Jackson and Cory Higgins guarding Shved made the reigning VTB MVP a complete non-factor, as they limited him to 31 percent shooting from the field and a cumulative PIR of 23 for the series. It was the kind of performance that made the Golden State Warriors’ run in the NBA postseason look pedestrian in comparison.

While all the attention was on Shved and Teodosic, and for good reason, de Colo proved once again this VTB finals why he is one of the best guards in all of Europe. De Colo didn’t really impress in his tenure with the San Antonio Spurs, and there are always doubts amongst European basketball fans about the legitimacy of de Colo’s tenure so far with CSKA. Is he a MVP-caliber player because of or despite Teodosic? Some people will credit Teodosic’s big time shooting and playmaking as the reason why de Colo is successful: teams are more afraid of the Serbian wizard hurting them than the French guard.

De Colo bucked that theory in what was a magnificent series from beginning to end. In game 1, he scored 21 points, shot 57 percent from the field, put up an efficiency of 20 and had a +/- of 22. What is probably the most underrated aspect of de Colo’s game is his ability to draw fouls and get to the line. The 29-year-old guard did that in bunches in game 1, as he drew 7 fouls, and went 12-13 from the line. As for Teodosic? Well, he only scored 7 points and put up a PIR of 8 while shooting 25 percent from the field.

In game 2, Teodosic stepped up and his biggest game of the series, as Khimki actually made things close in the first half. He scored 23 points, on 8-of-11 shots from the field (73 percent), and posted a game-high PIR of 24. But once again, de Colo’s performance was also solid, as he scored 20 points, shot 7 of 13 from the field (54 percent), posted a PIR of 14, and drew a game high 6 fouls. While Milos got all the attention, you can see in the highlights below that de Colo did his share of damage in the series swinging game 2 win.

In the deciding game 3 CSKA victory, it was once again de Colo who shined brightest, as he scored 20 points, 6-of-12 from the field (50 percent), had 4 rebounds, 3 assists, put up a PIR of 19, and had a +/- of 34, a game high. Once again, Khimki threw all they could to stop the French national, whether it was Shved or Markel Brown or the “Russian Delly” Viacheslav Zaitcev, and yet it had no effect. De Colo proved once again that though he doesn’t have the personality or flair of teammate Teodosic, or perhaps even Khimki’s Shved, he’s the VTB’s best overall player, and there was no doubting that as he was awarded Final MVP during CSKA’s trophy raising ceremony on Khimki’s home turf.


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There were other stories worth talking about from this series for sure. Semen Antonov emerged as CSKA’s go to guy and leading minutes-man in the block as he put up 16 and 18 points in game 1 and 2, respectively. Aaron Jackson may have earned himself a bigger contract and role for another club in Europe for his efficient performance as well as shutting down Shved. Kyle Hines continued his streak of winning championships as a player, going back to his time with Olympiacos as well as Bamberg. And one has to wonder if Dusko Ivanovic and his ponytail will be back on the Khimki bench after going down so soundly in the VTB Finals.

And while it wasn’t the biggest story, one has to feel that Itoudis validated himself and his future as CSKA head coach. Itoudis, a disciple of Zeljko Obradovic (he was his top assistant when Obradovic was at Panathinaikos), has done nothing but succeed in his tenure with the “Russian Army” team. Three Euroleague Final Fours, three VTB titles, and a Euroleague championship. Yes, he does coach a club with the biggest budget in Europe (35 million Euros). However, big budgets don’t necessarily translate to automatic success. Real Madrid, who has the second-largest budget (27 million Euros), is in a dogfight with Valencia in the ACB Finals and was whooped by CSKA in the third-place game in the Euroleague Final Four. And Olimpia Milano had the sixth-biggest budget in the Euroleague (19 million Euros) and they finished in dead last in the Euroleague, and were bounced in the semi-finals of the Lega Basket Serie A playoffs.

The bottom line? Money helps, but you need the right coach to put it all together. Itoudis has done that in his three years in CSKA, and he should do that going forward as head man of CSKA in the next couple of years at least. And if CSKA decides to go “crazy owner” and let him go? Well, Itoudis will have his pick of the top jobs in Europe. And he will be successful, no doubt about it.

But even that Itoudis redemption story is secondary to de Colo. De Colo will be back in CSKA, and the roster will look a whole lot different for the most part. Jackson will probably be gone, as well as his running mate Teodosic. And yet, the CSKA train will keep humming. De Colo will keep making big time shots, getting to the line, and carrying this club to top-level success, even though we will try to think of ways to doubt him or lessen his accomplishments. Maybe we will say it’s “Itoudis’ coaching” or “Kyle Hines’ mentorship” next year as the reason why de Colo puts up another All-Euroleague campaign.

But let the highlights speak for themselves below…

Yep. It’s about time we put those doubts of de Colo as a superstar player in Europe back in our pockets where they belong.

And make sure they stay there for a good stretch of time…

Panathinaikos completes comeback; Olympiacos fans unravel; and the uncomfortable reality of ‘ultra’ culture

Yesterday was a big day in European basketball. Fenerbahce, as expected, took a two-game lead over Besiktas in the Turkish BSL finals. Brose Bamberg won their third straight German title, and eighth domestic championship in nine seasons. And, Valencia pulled off a huge upset in Madrid to even the up the series in the ACB Liga Endesa finals.

However, all of those games deferred to the last big game of the day, which was the deciding Game 5 of the Greek Basket League championship between heated rivals Panathinaikos and Olympiacos in Piraeus.

If you follow European basketball (or just basketball in general) on Twitter, you probably heard about the incident in Piraeus that resulted in a wild, but dangerous ending. I will talk about that part later, and some of my own thoughts about the “ultra” culture.

However, I want to talk about the game first, for what PAO did seems to get lost in the discussion due to the events that happened in the last two minutes.


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Make no mistake, what PAO did wasn’t easy. While PAO took care of games 2 and 4 in Athens, they struggled immensely all year in Piraeus. Going into game 5, they were 0-4 for the year on Olympiacos’ home turf, which also includes their matchup in the Euroleague. The Red and White’s extremely physical style of play proved to be difficult for PAO, as their 90’s New York Knicks approach to basketball seemed to throw PAO off rhythm, especially on the offensive end. With a Greek Basket title on the line, and the Olympiacos ultras going to be in full, ridiculous and intimidating force, it seemed unlikely that PAO would be able to pull off Game 5 and come back from a 2-1 deficit in the series.

And yet, PAO not only beat Olympiacos in Peace and Friendship stadium, but absolutely dominated the game from the five minute mark of the first quarter on. Olympiacos put up an early 11-3 lead, but the wheels came off for the defending champs after the hot start. Though Olympiacos led 17-14 in the first quarter, PAO won the second quarter 10-22 and then the third quarter 10-21 to go up  37-57, which was too insurmountable for the home team to overcome, as they lost 51-66 to the Athenian visitors.

One could credit PAO head coach Xavi Pascual for adjusting his offense in the critical game. A coach who depends on his big playbook and heavily patterned offense, Pascual ceded control to his ball-dominant point guards Nick Calathes and Mike James. Calathes and James hurt the Olympiacos defense all game long, whether it was in isolation, drive and kicks for open threes (especially to KC Rivers who hit three 3-pointers), or in the pick and roll. For the game, Calathes put a line of 12 pts, 4 rebounds and 3 assists, and James, the MVP for the game, put up a line of 11 points, 10 rebounds and 6 assists, good for a game high PIR of 19. If you watch the highlights below, you will see Calathes and James come up time and time again making big plays on the offensive end.

On the defensive end, PAO took away drives and the paint from OLY and forced their rival to beat the Greens from deep. The strategy worked, as OLY shot 25 percent from beyond the arc on 28 shots. Add that with 12 turnovers committed (in comparison to PAO’s 7), and it made sense that PAO won by such a large, and comfortable margin. Center Ioannis Bourousis took away scoring opportunities in the paint from OLY, as he had two blocks, a steal, and neutralized Nikola Milutinov, Khem Birch and Patric Young in the block, as they only combined for 8 points combined.

The disappointment in the finals for OLY could somewhat be contributed to stars Vassilis Spanoulis and Georgios Printezis failing to come through in the big moments. One could blame fatigue or PAO’s depth and defensive focus just getting to them in the final game of the year. However, the fact of the matter is OLY depends on their top two stars to win, and when they don’t play well, the game become very difficult for the club, especially on the offensive end. Spanoulis went 2-for-11 from the field and had 4 turnovers, good for a PIR of 5 (9 points total). Printezis was even worse, as he went 2-for-14, scored only 4 points, and had a 0 PIR. A combined 13 points from your two biggest players is not a formula for success, and OLY learned that the hard way in the title game.

This season is a bit of validation for Pascual, who was fired last summer from Barcelona despite his history of success with the club. In his first season in Athens, Pascual won a Greek title (snapping Olympiacos’ title streak) and made the Euroleague playoffs as a 4 seed (19-11 overall) despite taking over after the season started. That is a stark contrast to Barcelona, who finished 11th overall in the Euroleague (12-18 overall), lost in the first round of the ACB playoffs, and is now looking for a new head coach after firing Georgios Bartzokas after one season.

As Barcelona shuffles again for another head coach (and apparently being rejected by Sarunas Jasikevicius, who is apparently staying with Zalgiris), Pascual is once again on the top perch with the best coaches in Europe. Quite a turn of events in less than a year.


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I am still new to European basketball, as I have been following European ball on a regular basis for about 2.5 years now. When watching domestic leagues, it is refreshing to see how styles are different from country to country. The ACB is a more wide open style, with a bigger focus on offense and games being called more tightly. The Greek Basket league on the other hand is 80’s Big East Basketball: physical, no-holds barred, and not a lot called (and not just Olympiacos; I watched some AEK, PAOK, and Aris games and they all played the same way). I can appreciate both styles, as diversity in the game is always fun to see from a fan’s perspective.

However, the big difference between Europe and American NBA fans is the “ultra” culture. Though it’s pretty well-known in soccer circles, it does carry over to basketball, especially in Greece. In the last two minutes, with the game obviously going to end in PAO’s favor, the Olympiacos ultras showed their “dissatisfaction” with the result around the two minute mark, as evidenced below.

For a fan that’s used to NBA fanbases, who switch their team allegiance depending on what club LeBron James is on, this was quite the sight. I mean, fireworks, flares, explosions and for a good 20-30 seconds, the players didn’t seem fazed, as if this was just normal for them. Even on Twitter, as I remarked my shock, I was brought back to earth by people quite familiar with the Greek basketball scene:

Yep. I still have a lot to learn about Greek, and perhaps even European, basketball in general.

Overall, even though I imagine this kind of stuff is going to be expected on my end in the Greek League, it shows how different and ugly “ultra” culture can get. Sometimes, as Americans, “ultra” culture can be seen as “wow, these fans are so much better than American ones” or “it’s like a college environment!” And yes, when the focus is on the games, the “ultras” can give off that impression to us “outsiders”. It’s easy to see the positive when you only look at the surface.

However, between this incident, and my viewing of a recent documentary “Forever Pure” which looks at the La Familia “ultra” fan base of Beitar Jerusalem, I definitely have a modified view of “ultra” culture. It’s not just a bunch of fans coming together to be loud and cheer. There’s deep politics to these groups, as “ultra” groups can be vessels for extreme politicians who know they can mobilize people and an agenda better at a sporting event than a rally. And unfortunately, these “ultra” politics sometimes can be racist and hateful. There can be violence. There can be demonstrations of slurs that would make most people in America cringe. I mean, take a look at some of the photos below:

Can you imagine if a scene like that broke out in America? Can you imagine what Adam Silver would do? Hell, could you imagine what senators would come out of the woodwork and claim that as an act of terror? Stephen A. Smith, Skip Bayless and Jason Whitlock (or even Donald Trump, that ever-opportunistic bastard)  would be spewing conservative nonsense for weeks. This made “Malice in the Palace” look like a middle school lunchtime scuffle.

I’m not referring to all Olympiacos fans as responsible for this incident. I know many Olympiacos fans and they are practical basketball people who don’t get wrapped up in the politics or antics of “ultra” culture (like the people who run Courtside Diaries who are good knowledgeable basketball people and excellent writers not to mention Olympiacos fans). And yet, honestly, my view of Olympiacos and perhaps Greek basketball clubs as a whole has changed because of this. I am not a fan of this shit in any sport, and it’s a big reason why I don’t embrace soccer as much as other people. This is not fandom. What happened was outright dangerous for everyone involved.

I love European basketball, and I do love the Greek game, and will continue to love both going forward. It’s physical, heated on the court and amongst fan bases, and when things are in control, the fan environments can be the best in Europe, maybe the best in the world. But it’s important to understand the depths of “ultra” culture, and it’s not always positive, and it shouldn’t always be duplicated. Even in America we see MLS fans try to “duplicate” this behavior in their own fan sections and stadiums without knowledge of what these “ultras” are really about, which isn’t always about the game, but rather politics.

I am not totally discouraging “ultra” culture. I know it can enhance the game experience. And I know it’s not just a basketball thing, as it is more pronounced in soccer. However, I got a new perspective on European basketball this weekend. There’s a dark side, a reality that isn’t really all that comfortable to witness. I have to admit, I felt uncomfortable watching the last two minutes of that game. I felt something horrendous was going to happen. I felt as if I was watching something from a movie, not a live game.

We shouldn’t feel that way when watching sport, especially basketball.

We should just enjoy the beautiful game. And we shouldn’t expect chaos because the road team won on a hated rivals home court. It shouldn’t be “well…it wasn’t that bad all things considered.”

But it’s going to be that way from now on. I am going to expect shit to go down now in certain matchups from here on out. And that’s sad considering how much I love European basketball.

It’s amazing how one event can scar or desensitize you so easily.

A Quick Preview to the Winner League (Israel) Final Four

On Monday, June 12th, the 2017 Winner League (Israeli Basketball Super League) Final Four will tip off at Menorah Mivtachim Arena in Tel Aviv (home of Maccabi Fox Tel Aviv). What makes this field interesting is that the last four Winner League champions are represented: Maccabi Haifa (2013), Maccabi Tel Aviv (2014), Hapoel Jerusalem (2015) and Maccabi Rishon (2016). Considering the Final Four’s format is akin to the Euroleague and NCAA model, where it only takes two games to win the championship, any of the four clubs have a chance to add another title to their mantle.

Let’s break down each team and what their chances are to be hoisting that Winner League trophy at the end of the championship final.

(All stats from the quarterfinals and not regular season unless noted)

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Maccabi Rishon

Winner League regular season record:

17-16 (7th seed)

Quarterfinals:

Beat Hapoel Eliat (2nd seed) 3-2

Players to watch:

G/F Patrick Richard (14.0 ppg, 4.6 rpg, 13.0 PIR in QF), PG Cameron Long (10.2 ppg, 3.8 rpg, 3.6 apg, 11.6 PIR), PF Elishay Kadir (10.6 ppg, 5.4 rpg, 4.2 fouls drawn per game, 13.8 PIR).

What you should know about Maccabi Rishon:

Rishon are the defending champions, as they went from a 6 seed, 16-17 team entering the playoffs and went on a fairytale run to their first Winner League championship. Led by former Israel National Team (and now current Maccabi Tel Aviv) coach Arik Shivek, and regular season MVP Darryl Monroe (who averaged a league 25.0 PIR), the underdog club upset third-seed Maccabi Haifa in the quarterfinals 3-2, and then proceeded to upset second-seed Maccabi Tel Aviv 71-68 in the Semifinals, and then top-seeded Hapoel Jerusalem 83-77 in the final. Rishon’s Cinderella run displayed what can happen when a team comes in hot in the postseason, especially with the “one and done” Final Four format.

This season feels similar to last season in a variety of ways. Despite winning a Winner League title, the club wasn’t able to capitalize much on the success, as they went 17-16 in the regular season (only 1 game better than the previous year), fired Shivek mid-season, and finished as the 7th seed, seemingly heavy underdogs to the favored Hapoel Eilat. And yet, in a crazy, topsy turvy series, Hapoel Eilat, much like last season, punched their ticket to the Final Four once again by upsetting the two-seed in five games.

What are their chances to win the championship?

Unlike last season, Rishon doesn’t have that “star” player this year like they did last season with Monroe. Rishon struck out on imports Joe Jackson (who only played 2 games) and Maalik Wayns (who played 16). However, this playoff season, they have been led by the guard combo of Richard and Long, who averaged 14 ppg and 10.2 ppg, respectively in the series against Eilat. Additionally, power forward and Israeli national Kadir had a monster series as well, as he averaged 10.6 ppg on 74.2 percent shooting from the field.

Rishon is playing some of their best basketball this year under head coach Smulik Brenner, who has done a solid job after Shivek left the club during the year. That being said, the big question for Rishon is if they will be able to handle the athleticism and star power of Jerusalem. Jerusalem went 3-0 in the regular season against Rishon and won by margins of 20, 14, and 24 in those contests.

If Rishon wants to have a chance, they are going to have push the tempo, force turnovers (they averaged 6.6 in their quarterfinal series), control the glass (they averaged more rebounds than Jerusalem in the regular season; 38.1 to 34.9), and continue their hot shooting from beyond the arc (they shot 40 percent from 3 against Eilat). As much star power as Jerusalem, they have a tendency to coast or be unfocused at times, especially on the defensive end, an area that Rishon can exploit considering how well offensively they have been playing.

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Hapoel Jerusalem

Winner League regular season record:

19-14 (3rd seed)

Quarterfinals:

Beat Ironi Nahariya (6th seed) 3-2 (down 2-0 and won three straight games).

Players to watch:

SF Tarence Kinsey (14.4 ppg, 2.4 rpg, 3.0 spg, 16.6 PIR), Guard Curtis Jerrells (13.8 ppg, 1.4 spg, 4.4 apg, 14.4 PIR), Guard Jerome Dyson (10.6 ppg, 2.6 rpg, 2.8 apg, 10.2 PIR), PF Lior Eliyahu (8.8 ppg, 5.2 rpg, 2.4 apg).

What you should know about Hapoel Jerusalem:

Jerusalem gained a lot of popularity this off-season for signing Amare Stoudemire, who also owns a minority stake in the club. However, Stoudemire has somewhat limped to the finish, as he only played in three playoff games, and averaged 13.7 mpg in the playoff series against Ironi. That being said, this is an immensely talented squad beyond Stoudemire, led by Italian national and former Montepaschi Siena head coach Simone Pianigiani, who will be heading to Olimpia Milano at the conclusion of the season.

Tarence Kinsey, who played last year with Crvena Zvezda, has emerged as Jerusalem’s best all-around player this postseason. He average 14.4 ppg, and shot not only over 60 percent from 2-pt shots, but also on 3-pt shots as well. And if that wasn’t enough, he averaged 3.0 spg, a key reason why Jerusalem turned things around against Ironi despite facing a 2-0 deficit.

In addition to Kinsey (who averages 29.2 mpg), Pianigiani relies heavily on guards Jerrells (who averages a team high 34.8 mpg this postseason) and Dyson (who averages 23.8 mpg) and post players Eliyahu (27.4 mpg) and center Richard Howell (24.2 mpg). This is not a deep team by any means, and the fatigue certainly has certainly showed up on occasion not only in the regular season, but post-season as well (hence, why they went down 2-0, with both losses coming at home). Yet despite their lack of depth, Jerusalem’s top talent stacks up with any club in the Winner League.

What are their chances to win the championship?

Jerusalem is looking for revenge, as they were upset by Rishon in the championship a year ago, thus being denied a back-to-back title run. It will be hard for Rishon to handle the athletic and quick trio of Jerrells-Dyson-Kinsey, and Eliyahu has emerged as the team leader in the frontcourt as Stoudemire has struggled through injuries and fatigue. If Jerusalem can keep the pace slow, get in their pick and roll actions in the half court (Pianigiani is known to rely heavily on the pick and roll as a coach), and minimized the damage on the glass, then Jerusalem should be able to handle this contest easily.

One big issue for Jerusalem though, other than their rebounding disadvantage as explained earlier, is their porous free throw shooting this postseason. Jerusalem shot 54.4 percent from the charity stripe in their five-game season against Ironi, with awful performances coming from their post players: Eliyah shot 36.4 percent and Howell shot 36.8 on free throws. Even their perimeter players didn’t fare too hot in the series, as Dyson shot 53.3 percent on free throws in the series. This is key because it bit them in the butt in games 1 and 2, as they shot 51.7 and 42.9 percent from the line in their losses in games 1 and 2, respectively. They improved their percentages in games 3 and 4 (54.5 and 68.2 percent, respectively), which resulted in wins, but they regressed back in game 5 (50 percent). Luckily for them, the game was out of reach so it didn’t hurt them. But if Jerusalem wants to get their second title in three years, they have to be closer in free throw shooting to their season average (70.6 percent) and not their playoff one.

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Maccabi Haifa

Winner League regular season record:

16-17 (8th seed)

Quarterfinals:

Beat Hapoel Holon (1st seed) 3-1 (won three straight games)

Players to watch:

PG John Dibartolomeo (22.5 ppg, 3.8 rpg, 3.8 apg, 67.9 3-pt percentage, 22.7 PIR in QF), PF/C Kevinn Pinkney (10.1 ppg, 5.1 rpg, 18.3 PIR in QF), PG Gregory Vargas (10.3 ppg, 3.3 rpg, 6.3 apg in QF), PF Oz Blayzer (14.5 ppg, 4.5 rpg, 13.3 PIR in QF)

What you should know about Maccabi Haifa:

Haifa is a team who’s better than their record indicates. Yes, they were 16-17 during the regular season, but they had a +128 point differential, which was the second best mark behind Holon. Thus, this was probably a team that should have won 18-20 games, not one that only won 16 and had a losing record. (I talk about pythagorean W-L a bit in my previous post on Brose Bamberg who also had a differential between expected and actual record.)

Despite being the eight-seed, Haifa came out and utterly steamrolled the top-seeded Holon three-games to one. While the team got expected production from leading scorer Vargas, who averaged 10.3 ppg and 6.3 apg in the four-game series, it was the breakout of American point guard and University of Rochester product Dibartolomeo who ended up breaking the back of the top-seeded Holon. The young guard scored an incredible 22.5 ppg and shot nearly 68 percent from beyond the arc, all career numbers considering he only averaged 9.9 ppg during the regular season. Another breakout star was Pinkney, who averaged 13 ppg and 7.3 rpg in the four game series, while providing muscle and energy in the paint that neutralized the favored Holon.

What are their chances to win a championship?

Head coach Offer Rahimi coached under Mickey Gorka during their 2014 title run, so he understands the culture of this Haifa club and what it takes to win. Haifa plays an all-out style, as they don’t have the most size out of the clubs in the Winner League, but they can score buckets, push the pace, and get hot from beyond the arc. This has led to a high variance in their scores (hence the reason why they went 16-17), but it’s entertaining, and when they are feeling it, they can seem unbeatable.

Unfortunately, they will be facing a tough challenge in Tel Aviv, who also play a run and gun style and have a similar team composition, though Tel Aviv is slightly more talented and athletic on the perimeter. One of Tel Aviv’s weaknesses this year is on the glass, as they don’t rebound well, and don’t have the size to keep teams off the offensive glass either. Haifa thrives in this area, as they like to crash and get up second and third-chance attempts. Haifa will be giving away a lot of advantages to Tel Aviv, but if Haifa crashes the glasses, wins on 50-50 balls and can transition their hot shooting stroke, then they have a puncher’s chance to continue their Cinderella run to the Finals and perhaps into a championship.

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Maccabi Tel Aviv

Winner League regular season record:

19-14 (4th place)

Quarterfinals:

Beat Enei Herzliya 3-0

Players to watch:

Guard Andrew Goudelock (14 ppg, 3.0 rpg, 3.7 apg, 16 PIR in QF), Forward Victor Rudd (15.3 ppg, 6 rpg, 3.3 apg, 19 PIR in QF), Forward Quincy Miller (17.3 ppg, 6 rpg, 22.7 PIR in QF).

What you should know about Maccabi Tel Aviv:

I have already gone in length about Maccabi Tel Aviv’s playoff run in a previous post so I won’t go too much into this. But I will say that the combination of Arik Shivek’s arrival (though most likely temporary, as the courtship of David Blatt, whether they get him or not, is a sign that they are looking to upgrade with a big name hire) and Quincy Miller’s resurgence (after suffering through injury most of the year) has helped Maccabi turn a 180 after a season finish that included a 2-8 record in their last 10 games and the firing of Ainars Bagatskis (who was their third coach this year). That being said, this Maccabi team has been hot and cold all year and has gone through big ups and then tremendous downs with the various coaching changes this year (Rami Hadar and Bagatskis all had moments where it seemed like they would be the solution for the remainder of the season). So while this Maccabi team looks good now, that is no guarantee that they will continue such a performance in the Final Four.

What are their chances to win a championship?

Their matchup with Haifa is beneficial to the Winner League power. Haifa, as solid as they are, play a similar style to Tel Aviv, which doesn’t really exploit Tel Aviv’s weaknesses. In order to beat Tel Aviv, you need to be a solid rebounding team, you need to beat them in the post, and you got to make them play a half-court, slow it down game. Unfortunately, while Haifa is a slightly better rebounding team, but it’s not a considerable advantage, and it is debatable if Haifa can do those other two factors with any confidence. Tel Aviv won the season series 2-1, and when they did lose to Haifa, they were going through that horrid stretch where the club was embroiled with internal turmoil. Those days look to be gone (as of now).

If Tel Aviv does take care of business, it could result in a matchup with rival Jerusalem, who most likely will be looking for revenge after losing the Israeli Cup to Tel Aviv. While I have discussed about Miller before, one key to this series could be the offensive AND defensive performance of Andrew Goudelock. Goudelock missed considerable time to injury and was deemed less of a problem than Sonny Weems, who was released mid-season after a disappointing tenure in Israel. There is no question that Goudelock can put up buckets, as he has been known as one of the most dynamic one-on-one scorers in all of Europe. But he can be a black hole offensively at times, and can take plays off defensively as well, not necessarily a plus for a club that struggles with team defense in general.

And yet, this Final Four may be a “tryout” of sorts for Goudelock. Miller may have earned the second year of his contract with his quarterfinal performances, but Goudelock’s future seems less secure. Many have blamed him for the team’s inconsistencies, especially on defense. But, Goudelock, when motivated, can be a game-changing force, as he showed in past Euroleague stops as well as the NBA and D-League. If he can rekindle that force in the Final Four and lead the Blue and Gold to another title, it could result in him being back in Tel Aviv under the new coaching regime.

A disappointing Final Four performance though? Well, it’s safe to say his first season in Tel Aviv will be his last (much like Weems) if that should happen.

Brose Bamberg: BBL dominance, Euroleague improvement, and the future for Trinchieri…

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After their 88-76 win over EWE Baskets Oldenburg in Game 2 of the EasyCredit BBL finals, Brose Bamberg looks set for another German domestic league championship celebration (though Oldenburg should get some credit for their incredible Cinderella playoff run). The “Freak City” club has made things look relatively easy this postseason, as they not only dispatched Oldenburg 96-60 in Oldenburg in Game 1, but they also swept Bayern Munich (a club that made the Eurocup playoffs this year and played in the Euroleague as recently as last year) in the semifinals.

The dominant performance this postseason can be considered another notch on the Bamberg championship belt that has been getting larger and larger since the 2009-2010 season. In the seven-year span, Bamberg has won the BBL six out of the last seven years (with it bound to be seven out of eight perhaps as soon as Sunday). The only time they did not win the BBL was during the 2013-2014 season, where they finished as the No. 2 seed, but were upset by in the first round of the playoffs by the Artland Dragons. (Bayern Munich ended up beating Alba Berlin in the championship.) Furthermore, in the same time span, they have won four German Cups, with the most recent one being this season.

What has made Bamberg’s dominance in German basketball so remarkable is that they don’t fit the profile of most clubs who are considered “powers” in European basketball. Bamberg’s a small city (73,000 population) that’s a fraction of the size of the metropolitan populations of their major BBL rivals in Berlin (3.5 million) and Munich (1.45 million). They had only a budget of about 8.5 million Euros in 2016-2017, which was the third-lowest of any Euroleague club (only Zalgiris and Crvena Zvezda has lower budgets). They don’t have a deep club developmental program like many of the top clubs in Europe. And when they do sign players, they either get “under-the-radar” German talent, or players who are looking to revitalize their careers whom they can sign on a discount. Just looking at this year’s club: forward Nicolo Melli and Fabien Causeur came to Bamberg from Olimpia Milano and Baskonia, respectively, after lackluster seasons, and a diminishment in role with their previous clubs. Since their arrival, Melli became the club’s most valuable player in Euroleague competition, and Causeur has been the club’s leading scorer in BBL play at 12.6 ppg. Already there are rumors that Melli and perhaps Causeur may be pursued by other clubs this summer, but as usual, Bamberg will have a plan to replace these top players, a seemingly annual tradition for the “small-market” German club.

Those are a lot of factors against the club, and yet, the club is on the verge of another BBL championship. For fans of European basketball who are relatively new to the game (such as myself), what Bamberg is doing is impressive, and should be a model for other European clubs who want to find long-term success despite not being in a large metro area or having the biggest budget to sign free agent players.


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While Bamberg’s dominance in the BBL has been noted, they haven’t had quite the same success in the Euroleague. The club has qualified for the Round of 16 twice, but has never advanced to the playoff stage at all in their eight-appearance history in the Euroleague. While a spot in the Euroleague is always reserved for a team from the BBL, Bamberg, much like the other clubs in Germany, do not have A license designation, which means that they are constantly competing for a Euroleague spot year after year. Being in the Euroleague boosts clubs in so many ways: it gives the club more exposure, it helps them attract talent, and most importantly, it gives them more revenue opportunities. Bamberg has been able to capitalize on this, parlaying their frequent Euroleague appearances into building a strong club foundation that can still succeed despite frequent changes in talent (remember, last year the club lost Brad Wanamaker to Darussafaka in the off-season).

In the first year of the new Euroleague, Bamberg was Germany’s lone Euroleague representative, and the season was a bit of a mixed bag. After a 20-point win at home over FC Barcelona, the club was 7-9 after Round 16, and had an outsider’s chance of making the playoffs. However, injuries, inconsistency on the court, and well…bad luck resulted in them losing four straight games from rounds 17-20 (killing any postseason hope) and going 3-11 down the stretch, good for 10-20 overall and 13th overall in the standings (they were tied record-wise with Maccabi Fox Tel Aviv, but they had a better point differential and swept Maccabi during the regular season).

On a first glance, one could say that it was a disappointing Euroleague campaign. However, this Bamberg team was much better than its record-indicated. Even though they had a 10-20 record, they ranked 6th in PPG (79.9) and 12th in PPGA (81). The difference of a negative 1.1 ppg average resulted in a pythagorean record (expected W-L) of 14-16. Just judging by pythagorean W-L, Bamberg finished 10th in the Euroleague, which is better than Zalgiris, Barcelona and Galatasaray, all clubs who finished better in the actual standings than Bamberg.

So what does this mean? Well, the big difference in pythagorean and actual record indicates that Bamberg was really unlucky last season in the Euroleague. In games decided by 5 points or less, Bamberg was 2-11 last season. Now, some enthusiasts may credit that to the club “not being clutch”  or “unable to handle pressure”, but the reality is that a few breaks here or a few breaks there, and maybe that record is 6-7, 7-6 or hell even 11-2. Was Bamberg a playoff club last year? Not quite, according to pythagorean record, but they were right on the cusp. If they can keep most of the core from this year’s club, and replace those who leave with some “underappreciated” stars like they have done in the past, than it is possible that this club could be a playoff team if their luck does a 180 in 2017-2018 in the Euroleague.

(Of course, this is assuming Bamberg closes out this series against Oldenburg and doesn’t pull an Asvel or Golden State Warriors.)


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What will be key to Bamberg’s continued success is how long head coach Andrea Trinchieri stays in “Freak City.” After taking over in 2014 for Chris Fleming, the current German national team head coach and an assistant with the Brooklyn Nets, Trinchieri has continued the standard of success set by his predecessor, as Bamberg has won the BBL title every year in his tenure. This is not a surprise, as Trinchieri has been successful in his two previous stops before he made the move to Germany. With UNICS, he helped the club reach the Eurocup finals in 2013-2014, and he had considerable success with Italian club Cantu, as they won the Italian Second Division in 2009, the Italian Supercup in 2012, and was named Italian League coach of the year twice (2010, 2011).

Trinchieri is known as an offensive guru, able to get the most out of his players even without high-profile talent. He utilizes constant motion and movement in the half court, with an emphasis on high ball and away screens from his post players, and a strong emphasis on the three-point shot. Trinchieri’s offense feels modern in terms of professional ball: you see a lot of pick and roll, and a lot of drive and kick for open three point shots. However, it’s also obvious that he demands a lot from his bigs in terms of craftiness. What ‘s impressive from what you see on the video below is how post (and even wing) players will throw off defenders in initial actions, faking away or ball screens and then cutting to the basket or popping to the mid-range or three point line for open looks. Possessions vary each time down the court, but there are rules and some basic continuity to what’s going on in the halfcourt for Bamberg, a sign of a well-run, but flexible offense.

One of the biggest beneficiaries of Trinchieri’s philosophy has been Melli, who has excelled in Trinchieri’s system in his two seasons in Bamberg. He is not the most physical or tallest post player, nor is he quick enough to be on the wing, but he is crafty on the floor, and is able to stretch opposing post defenders out with his shooting touch, both characteristics Trinchieri seems to prefer in his big men. Hence, it’s no surprise Melli went from an unheralded bench player to a borderline All-Euroleague player who may be seeing a big payday this summer from another club.

With a third-straight BBL title, Trinchieri may seek other challenges in the future, as soon as this offseason. Bamberg is doing all they can to sign him to an extension, but the Euroleague coaching carousel will get interesting this summer, especially depending on what jobs are taken by certain coaches this offseason (Zalgiris head coach Sarunas Jasikevicius to Barcelona and former Cleveland Cavs and Darussafaka head coach David Blatt to Maccabi Tel Aviv are popular predictions). Yes, Trinchieri will want another shot in the Euroleague with this club, especially after so many close losses last season. Yes, this city and club loves him and his animated personality. But the amount of respect he has in the European coaching community is only growing, and it feels like it’s only a matter of time before Trinchieri is able to land that “A License” job.

Bamberg has recovered from coaching losses before, as they transitioned seamlessly from Fleming to Trinchieri. However, to do it two times in a row? That won’t be easy, especially considering the lengths bigger-budget clubs such as Bayern Munich (they lobbied for a Euroleague Wild Card spot, and will undoubtedly increase their budget to acquire better players) and Alba Berlin (they are looking to upgrade at head coach after a disappointing couple of seasons) will go to catch up and dethrone Bamberg from the top perch.

As long as Trinchieri is there, Bamberg will continue it’s uncanny and atypical string of dominance in the BBL. But the end date on Trinchieri’s time in Freak City feels like it’s due soon. A year, maybe two tops if Bamberg is lucky. Good coaches in Europe don’t stay at small clubs for long.

Hence, Bamberg better have a contingency plan to soften the blow of his eventual departure, whenever it should occur.